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DIFFERENT SOURCES AND CONCENTRATIONS OF CALCIUM ALTERD GRAIN YIELD, OSMOTIC COMPONENTS AND SOME PHYSIOLOGICAL TRAITS IN MAIZE UNDER DROUGHT STRESS

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ABSTRACT

DIFFERENT SOURCES AND CONCENTRATIONS OF CALCIUM ALTERD GRAIN YIELD, OSMOTIC COMPONENTS AND SOME PHYSIOLOGICAL TRAITS IN MAIZE UNDER DROUGHT STRESS

Journal: Plant Physiology and Soil Chemistry

Author: Mostafa Heidari, Javad Pahlevan

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License CC BY 4.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/ppsc.02.2021.53.57

Lack of sufficient water around the world, is the most important factor to reducing the growth and yield of crops. The use of nutrient elements such as calcium can partially prevent its adverse effects on plants. Therefore, this experiment performed to study the effect of sources and different concentrations of calcium (C1=control, C2= 1.5, C3= 3g/l calcium chloride, C4= 1.5 and C5= 3 g/l calcium silicate) on maize under drought stress (W1= 8 (control), W2= 12 and W3= 16 days irrigation interval). The results showed that by increasing drought level from W1 to W3, grain yield, biomass, the weight of thousand seeds and the number of seed per plant were reduced. Application of calcium, especially 3 g/l calcium silicate improved them. Drought stress decreased the amount of chlorophyll “a”, relative water content (RWC), and increased electrolyte leakage, soluble carbohydrate and proline in leaf tissues. In the absence of drought stress, calcium silicate had a better effect than on maize plant. At the highest level of drought stress (W3), also application of 3 g/l calcium silicate improved the grain yield by reducing the amount of electrolyte leakage, increasing the synthesis of proline and soluble carbohydrates and also improving the yield components compared to calcium chloride. Therefore, it can be stated that calcium silicate at drought stress conditions has a greater effect than calcium chloride on maize plant.
Pages 53-57
Year 2021
Issue 2
Volume 1